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Email for Kids – 1 Year Subscription Giveaway

kidsemail2

Today’s technology-centric world is enough to make a parent a basket-case.  Bug is 8 and he knows less about the workings of the internet than most kids his age – thank goodness!    know of kids that aren’t much older than him that have email, Instagram and YouTube accounts.  That’s not happening in our house.  It’s nice to know that he has no idea what Instagram is so he doesn’t feel like he has to have one.  And to him, YouTube is just for listening to music and watching videos for school – all Mommy-approved and in her presence. But I know at some point he has to learn a little bit.   But how can you possibly do that with all the dangers lurking out there and all the junk on the internet?   There is no way I would give Bug a Gmail or Yahoo email address – I KNOW what kind of junk slips through their filters.    So how do you find email that is safe for kids?

Well the answer is, KidsEmail.org – they are providing a safe, secure option for email for kids. We’ve been having so much fun with Bug’s KidsEmail.org account!   Right now, only immediately family has his email address.

I love getting messages like this:

kidsemailWe still have a lot of work with punctuation and capitalization to do but I expect his writing skills to improve with time.  He enjoys “writing” letters by email much more than actually having to write things with pencil and paper.   So I see lots of language arts lessons in the future involving composing and email to someone with correct grammar, punctuation and capitalization!

So what are the benefits of KidsEmail.org? Well, first, I have a parent login where I can manage multiple accounts if I had multiple children. (There are even options for teen accounts!) Inside the parent login I can:

  • add address to my child’s contact list
  • set time restrictions
  • block senders
  • “ground” my child from email  – meaning turn off access to their account until a certain time
  • edit safety settings
  • view their activity log
  • and more!

Some of my favorite features are:

  • Having all messages sent to me first with the option to allow or block.  If I don’t want it in Bug’s inbox, it will never get there!  No spam getting thru!  There is also the option to automatically allow emails from contacts (which I’ve done since only family are in his contact list) but I can also still have a copy sent to me.  (Which is helpful so I know he has a message to check!)
  • Being able to have images, links and attachments removed from incoming mail.
  • That his Inbox page is free from ads!

I have a $59 gift card for KidsEmail.org so you can get a year of email service for kids!   With the $38.95 annual plan you can have up to 6 email address so all the kids can have one!

(And don’t forget you can sign up today for 30 days free!  If you win, you’ll be able to add your gift card to your account and continue your service!)

Enter now to win!

Click here for giveaway form >>> a Rafflecopter giveaway <<<

Giveaway ends 2/5/2017. US entries only. Must have a valid US mailing address to receive prize!

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Multicultural Children’s Book Day Review #ReadYourWorld | Amazing Places + activity ideas

I am happy to be participating in Multicultural Children’s Book Day!

The Multicultural Children’s Book Day (MCCBD) team’s mission to spread the word and raise awareness about the importance of diversity in children’s literature. Our young readers need to see themselves within the pages of a book and experience other cultures, languages, traditions and religions within the pages of a book. We encourage readers, parents, teachers, caregivers and librarians to follow along the fun book reviews, author visits, event details, a multicultural children’s book linky and via our hashtag (#ReadYourWorld) on Twitter and other social media.

My Book for MCCBD is Amazing Places poems selected by Lee Bennett Hopkins.

In this collection of original poems, acclaimed anthologist Lee Bennett Hopkins brings together fourteen selections that celebrate through poetic imagery some of the amazingly diverse places in our nation. These include Denali National Park, the Oneida Nation Museum, San Francisco s Chinatown, the Grand Canyon, the Ringling Circus Museum, Harlem, the Liberty Bell, Fenway Park, and more. The poems as a whole take readers on an exciting multiethnic travelogue around the United States and encourage a positive appreciation of our country s historical, environmental, and cultural heritage. The inspiring and insightful poems were created by some of the best-known authors writing for children, including Alma Flor Ada, Jaime Adoff, Joseph Bruchac, Rebecca Kai Dotlich, Nikki Grimes, J. Patrick Lewis, Jane Medina, and Linda Sue Park. Captivating illustrations by award-winning illustrators Chris Soentpiet and Christy Hale feature well-researched settings that infuse the poems with vibrant life and atmosphere.

BigG loves geography and interesting places.  I knew this would be a fun read for him.  The poems made it interesting to read.  I like exposing him to poetry – although at this point we’ve really only read funny poems – so this was a great way to experience some quality writing.  The book has some amazing artwork that illustrates the places in the poems.  I would love to see a part two as this really only covers a small portion of the United States’ amazing places.

G’s favorite was The Sandy Hook Lighthouse.  It’s a shape poem – written in the shape of a lighthouse!  And it has a very neat picture to go along with it.

My favorite was Niagara.  But it might be (again) because of the artwork.

The back of the book features details on each place feature in a poem.  That was helpful for answering G’s questions.

This book can be read cover to cover or you can do one poem at a time and expand upon it with activities and if you live close enough to the place the poem is based upon – you can take a field trip!

Since G’s favorite was the poem about the Sandy Hook Lighthouse we did lighthouse activities!  He loves to draw so he made his own.  Then he built (a rather good one!) our of LEGOs!

ternrock

I would love to take him to see it but I’m not sure I’m up for the 15 hour drive!

Thanks for checking out my MCCBD review.  Don’t forget to check out the hashtag #ReadYourWorld on social media to find more posts, reviews and books for this day!

Multicultural Children’s Book day 2016 Medallion Level Sponsors! 

Platinum: Wisdom Tales Press * StoryQuest Books*Lil Libros

Gold: Author Tori Nighthawk*Candlewick Press,* Bharat Babies

Silver: Lee and Low Books*Chronicle Books*Capstone Young Readers T

Tuttle Publishing ,NY Media Works, LLC/KidLit TV

Bronze: Pomelo Books* Author Jacqueline Woodson*Papa Lemon Books* Goosebottom Books*Author Gleeson Rebello*ShoutMouse Press*Author Mahvash Shahegh* China Institute.org*Live Oak Media

Multicultural Children’s Book Day has 12 amazing Co-Hosts:

All Done Monkey, Crafty Moms Share,Educators Spin on it,Growing Book by Book,Imagination Soup,I’m Not the Nanny,InCultural Parent, Kid World Citizen,Mama Smiles,Multicultural Kid Blogs,Spanish Playground

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CursiveLogic Workbook Giveaway

cursivelogic

I wrote a post a few months back asking Should we teach cursive handwriting to our kids?   (Spoiler alert – I think the answer is yes!) I knew all along that I would want to incorporate cursive handwriting lessons into our homeschool but I was afraid it would be met with resistance.  So I put it off for our first year.  I said 2nd grade would be better.  Well, towards the end of our 1st grade year BigG spotted a cursive book I had bought and his eyes lit up.  He said, “When am I going to learn THAT?”  I told him 2nd grade.  But he begged, and pleaded and begged some more so on the last day of first grade I taught him how to write his name in cursive.  I realize that’s probably not the way you’re supposed to but it made him happy.  He wrote his name in cursive all summer long.  And then when it was time to go “back to school” learning cursive was a huge motivator!  In fact for the first few weeks we started our day with cursive because it put him in a good, cooperative mood.  I know…this has been the weirdest experience.  LOL.

So we were using (to not name names) a “traditional” cursive handwriting program.  The same one I used in private school to learn cursive when I was his age.  But I realized that I just didn’t write like that anymore.  It’s not that I don’t write in cursive anymore, I do.  But this way….it was so….flourished.  With a lot of unnecessary loops that I just didn’t do anymore.  I was having to re-teach myself so I could teach him! Continue reading